Cinnamon Pancakes with Blueberry Syrup

BlueberriesThis recipe was submitted by a friend who says, “These cinnamon pancakes with blueberry syrup were served to us at a bed and breakfast in the Midwest this past summer. I’m glad I asked them for the recipe and they were generous enough to provide it. I told the proprietor that I was going to pass the recipe around and they were quite pleased. So here it is.”

INGREDIENTS:

2-1/4 cups flour
2 TBSP sugar
1 TSP cinnamon
2 TSP baking powder
1 TSP baking soda
1/2 TSP salt
2-1/2 cups buttermilk
6 TBSP butter (melted)
2 eggs ( at room temperature)
1 cup maple syrup
1 cinnamon stick
2/3 cup fresh blueberries

DIRECTIONS:

Whisk together the flour, sugar, cinnamon, baking powder, baking soda, and salt in a large bowl. In a separate bowl, whisk together the buttermilk, melted butter and eggs.

Make a well in the center of the flour mixture and whisk in the wet ingredients until just combined, with some small lumps.

Heat a non-stick griddle or electric frying pan over medium high heat until a drop of water sizzles when splashed on the pan. Brush the griddle with melted butter. Pour 1/4 cupful of batter onto the griddle per pancake, leaving space between the pancakes. When bubbles form all over the edges of the pancakes and they release easily, flip the pancakes with a spatula.

Cook on the other side until the pancakes are evenly pale golden, about 2 to 3 minutes more. Repeat, adding a little more butter to the griddle as needed.

Meanwhile, heat the syrup and cinnamon stick over medium-low heat until warm and fragrant. Lower the heat, stir in the blueberries and leave over low heat until the blueberries are just warmed, but still hold their shape, about 1 minute. Serve over warm pancakes and enjoy!

posted by Mountain Republic

Yum Plum Crumb Loaf

This recipe sounds great-can’t wait to give it a try!

NancyC

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Yum Plum Crumb Loaf…a little bit of a tongue-twister, but it really does describe this moist and tasty quick bread! Ann, who has lots of yummy recipes and had lots of plums from her backyard plum tree, gave me a recipe for Plum Bread that a friend gave her, which I changed up by adding a little more plums, a little more baking soda, and a crumb mixture on top. There’s actually some crumb mixture in the middle of the loaf too, just to give it a little extra sweetness, but it’s not very visible. I used red plums in this but you can use any kind of plum, or you could probably substitute peaches or nectarines, too–I haven’t tried that yet, but I don’t see why you couldn’t! I strongly recommend using parchment paper to line your loaf pan (instead of greasing the pan)–it will come out…

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Bacon and Cheese Biscuits


Ran across this recipe over at Zoom Yummy. I made these biscuits a while back and they were absolutely delicious. It’s  about time to make them again. They are so darn good! 

 

 

Here are the ingredients:

And here’s the bacon.

It’s a crucial part of the magic.

1. To make your own Bacon and Cheese Biscuits, first preheat the oven to 390°F (200°C).

2. Then slice the bacon thinly.

3. In a large pan, fry the bacon over moderate heat until crisp.

This will take a couple of minutes.

4. When beautifully crispy, remove the bacon from the pan and crumble it finely.

5. Grab the cheese and grate it.

Just like this.

This is a lot of cheese.

The cheese mostly will constitute the flavor of your biscuits. So choose the one you really like.

It’s completely up to you.

I used Leerdammer. Next time I’ll try Cheddar, I think.

It’s fun because the biscuits can be different every time.

6. Now we need a large bowl.

Using a pastry cutter (or just a fork), combine the flour, baking powder, salt, cayenne pepper and butter until crumbs form.

7. Stir in the grated cheese and the bacon.

8. Then add the milk…

9. …and stir together just until the dry ingredients are well moistened.

10. Transfer the dough onto a lightly floured surface and  knead the dough 4 – 5 times.

To make the biscuits perfectly soft, the trick is not to over-knead the dough.

11. Roll it out to about 1/2 inch (1 cm) thickness.

When it gets sticky use some flour to make the job easier.

12. Cut out rounds using a 2-inch (5 cm) cutter.

Pat the scraps together, re-roll them and cut out some more rounds.

13. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

Arrange your biscuits on the sheet about 1/2 inch (2.5 cm) apart.

14. And bake them for about 15 minutes.

These are so yummy. Enjoy, dear friends!

 

 
posted by Mountain Republic                                  recipe via: ZoomYummy

Date and Nut Loaf

I recently ran across this old date and nut loaf recipe. It produces a very delicious, extra moist date bread that I just haven’t been able to get enough of lately. I’ve made it several times in the last couple of weeks. It’s just so darn good!

Did you know that dates are really good for you? I guess my Grandmother did, because I remember that she often made this recipe. Besides being very high in both fiber and potassium, dates are also extremely rich in anti-oxidants.

This date bread smells really good when it’s cooking (I’ve got one in the oven right now!) but it tastes even better!

Did I mention that this recipe is quick and easy? Hope you enjoy. Here we go:

Date and Nut Loaf

Ingredients & Preparation:

  • Pour: 1 – 1/2 cups water boiling water over 1 – 1/2 cups chopped dates (1 – 8 oz. package) Stir lightly. Let cool
  • Mix together in a bowl: 1/2 cup brown sugar (packed), 1 TBSP.  soft shortening, 1 egg
  • Stir in: the dates and water
  • Sift together and stir in: 2 – 1/4 cups sifted flour, 1 TSP. baking soda, 1/2 TSP. salt
  • Blend in: 1 cup broken walnuts
  • Pour: into a well greased 9″ x 5″ x 3″ loaf pan. Let stand 20 minutes.
  • Bake: at 350° for 60 – 70 minutes. A toothpick stuck in center should come out clean

posted by Mountain Republic

Dust off the Waffle Iron. It’s Time to Get Saturday Night Serious

This is an old-fashioned cast-iron waffle iron for making waffles using a stove burner. To purchase one, click on the picture.

Having watched our politicians waffle on this tax extension matter (among many matters) I would like to make some waffles this Saturday night, name them after the worst political wafflers and BITE THEM!

The following recipes came from a little notebook kept by my paternal grandmother’s cook.   They date from the 1930s-40s – times like our own now.

Plain Waffles

  1. 2 cups Flour
  2. 2 teaspoons Baking powder
  3. 1/2 teaspoon Salt
  4. 3 eggs Eggs
  5. 1 cup Milk
  6. 4 tablespoons melted Shortening
  • Sift flour once, measure. Add baking powder and salt. Sift again.
  • Beat egg yolks and combine with milk and melted shortening.  Add gradually to the first mixture beating until smooth and creamy.
  • Beat egg whites until stiff.  Fold in gently to the above.
  • Bake in waffle iron.
  • Makes four 4-section waffles.

Next:  Fora change,  select your favorite waffle or try making some of each – a waffle worshiper would do nothing other than this.

  • Graham waffles – Use graham in place of white flour.  Because graham is not to be sifted, add dry ingredients from the basic recipe and blend very thoroughly before combining with the liquids also from the basic recipe.
  • Cheese waffles – add from 3/4 to 1 cup grated American cheese to plain waffle batter, stirring it in just before adding the beaten egg whites.  These waffles are delicious served with broiled bacon or with grilled tomatoes.

Rice Waffles

  1. 1 and 3/4 cups flour
  2. 2 tsp baking powder
  3. 1 teaspoon salt
  4. 3/4 cup cold cooked rice
  5. 2 eggs
  6. 2 Tbs sugar
  7. 1 and 1/2 cups milk
  8. 4 Tbs melted shortening
  • Sift flour.  Add baking powder, salt and sift again.
  • Add the rice and blend with a fork.
  • Beat the egg yolks and sugar. Combine with milk and melted shortening.
  • Combine the above two mixtures.
  • Beat until perfectly smooth.
  • Beat egg whites until stiff and fold into the two combined mixtures.
  • Bake in hot waffle iron. Makes 6 four-sectioned waffles.

Grandpa’s Table: Breakfast At Our Adirondack “Camp” from SamHenry

My maternal great grandfather started going to this little gem of a Lake in the foothills of the Adirondacks before I was born.  His son, my grandfater, owned his first cottage in a fairly well-populated bay but found a heavenly parcel with three lots and government property ringing most of it.

The house dated from the turn of the last century and was buried in trees with tall grass.  Not much mowing and all natural.

My favorite view of the property - from the old flat-bottomed fishing boat.

Inside was plain, not winterized, with tongue and groove unpainted walls.  The furniture was about the same date as the house; the kitchen dishes were depression-era glass and cheap reproduction willow ware and deep blue glasses.  In short, these camps were filled with anything you didn’t want at your main house anymore.

Grandpa with an iron frying pan full of sunny side up fried eggs cooked in bacon grease.

I began my trips there my first year on the planet and they continued until the camp (cottage for non-Adirondack vacation homes) was sold following my grandfather’s death.  In later years, my grandfather, a doctor, was the chief cook.  He and my uncle cooked wonderful breakfasts.  There was no dishwasher, a refrigerator only instituted in the place after 1970 and just the most basic iron cookware.  Water piped in from a well and turned off and on using faucets replaced the pump on the counter next to the sink around the same time.

All dining table and cooking equipment was kept in tall metal cabinets that shut tight to protect them from the mice and bugs.  Shelves were lined with oil cloth and, unlike today, seemed effortlessly spaced for successful storage.

I loved going fishing with Grandpa – often for the entire day.  He made up some Grandma Brown’s Baked Bean sandwiches (canned beans made in Mexico, NY) and brought some pop and other unrefrigerated snacks for lunch.  This was before ice packs and coolers.  He was not good about minding my mother’s rules about candy.  He would give me a few pieces and say “now I want you to take one of these once every ten minutes and see if you don’t feel better.”  When she would complain, he would turn to her and say: “I don’t get cavities from eating candy.  I keep my teeth in a glass nights and they are fine.”  He was a tease and a character.

Grandma and Grandpa on their way to the camp next door that was owned by his roommate at medical school. That family still owns their camp. This is one of my all time favorite pictures albeit from an early Kodak Instamatic.