Christmas Salad

This hand-written recipe from my Mom was dated Xmas 1952. I remember that my Aunt loved this Christmas Salad recipe & she always served it at her Christmas dinners. On the lower corner of the index card, my Mom scribbled the word “delish!” Hope you enjoy.

Merry Christmas to all from Mountain Republic!

Christmas Salad

INGREDIENTS:

  • 1 box Lime Jello
  • 1 box Cherry Jello
  • 1 can crushed pineapple
  • 1 jar Bing salad cherries, pitted
  • 1 cup chopped nuts (if desired)
  • whipped cream or Cool Whip etc.
  • red or green Maraschino cherries

PREPARATION:

  • Prepare Lime Jello according to directions on package, except use the pineapple juice in place of part of the water.
  • Add the pineapple (& nuts if desired) to the Lime Jello.
  • Prepare Cherry Jello according to directions on package, except use the Bing cherry juice in place of part of the water.
  • Add the pitted Bing cherries to the Cherry Jello.
  • Mold in separate layers. Chill.
  • Top with whipped cream.
  • Garnish with green or red Maraschino cherry.

posted by Mountain Republic

 

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SamHenry’s Saturday Night Specials – No Pun or Gun Intended

Grandmothers did a lot with cheeses.  Economical and readily available and in an  infinite variety, they had to be a key ingredient.  On Saturday or Sunday night for supper, they wouldn’t get out the fondue pot and long forks and set up the lazy Susan. If they did, they would probably use Tyler Florence’s recipe found here. More than likely they would serve something like Mountain Republic’s good old mac and cheese found right here OR they would have a little Welsh Rarebit.

Welsh Rarebit you say?  It is melted sharp cheddar and beer and a thickening agent, etc. over toast.  Mmmmmm.  Why it is called Welsh Rarebit is the stuff that fills whole lexicons.  Have fun Googling your idea of an answer.  There are many.

Served with a side of warm fruit compote (easily made) or fresh fruit on lettuce with a poppy seed dressing (or tossed greens with a light olive oil, apple cider vinegar, Dijon mustard and salt/pepper dressing) and you’re back in front of the TV with dinner, a beer and dessert and you only had to carry the plate in one hand, the beer in another.

Best to cook the compote ahead because, although simple to make, it takes 3 hours in the oven at low temperature to “candy” or sweeten  the fruit.  All fruit sweetens when cooked.  Here’s all you do:

Fruit Compote:

Pre-heat oven to 250 degrees.  In a baking or casserole dish, combine the following well-drained canned fruits:

1 can of cubed pineapple

1 can of peaches (cut to size of the pineapple cubes)

1 can of pears (cut to size of pineapple cubes)

Canned cherries if desired

Stir the mixture.  Sprinkle with brown sugar and unsalted butter pieces (or Olivio).

Cook for 2 hours. Then set temperature at 350 degrees and cook for another hour.  Delicious!  Worth the wait.  Probably VERY bad for you.

Now for the Welsh Rarebit:

I have attempted to lower the calories in this and to keep the ingredients simple.  There are many variations on this recipe so “Google” a few.

In a medium saucepan over low to medium  heat, make a roux of roughly 2 Tbs each unsalted butter (or Olivio) and flour ( all purpose or use Wondra – it’s easier).  A “roux” is the French culinary term for 1/2 flour and 1/2 fat cooked until smooth with a slight bubble.  It is the basis for most sauces.  How easy it that, eh?

Stir in a scant teaspoon Dijon or dry mustard and tsp Worcestershire sauce and the remaining ingredients:

dash of salt and pepper (freshly ground always).

1/2 cup whole milk or 3/4 cup heavy cream. (add more milk if mixture thickens too much)

1 and 1/2 cups grated sharp cheddar cheese.

1/2 cup of your favorite beer

I always crush a clove of garlic and put a little of the juice in.

Stir the above until melted and smooth.  Pour over your favorite toast (rye, whole wheat, etc.)

Now wasn’t that easy?

Grandmother’s Recipes – From The Family Canning Company

There was a canning company in my family until 1920.  After her father’s death, my Grandmother (paternal)  ran it with her uncle.  But when he died and she had married my grandfather, the time had come to sell it.

The Company had a rich history.  The Curtice Brothers, Simeon and Edwin, had a grocery store in Webster, NY near Lake Ontario.  It was a prime growing area for fruits and “garden truck.”  They made jams and jellies in their mother’s kitchen after  hours.  All of this led them to found a canning company in 1868.  The headquarters was located in Rochester, NY but their produce came, in the main, from the Genesee Valley south of Rochester.

Their fastidiousness about freshness and quality led them to locate canning plants in the fields where produce could be captured and processed at the peak of freshness.  They were pioneers in this approach.

Today, their advertisements, labels, jars and bottles are prime collectors items.  Anything I have has been purchased on the internet since most records of the company did not survive.

Here is a little booklet published in 1908 “Original Menus” that includes suggestions for the use of Curtice Brothers products along with original recipes.  Over time, I will reproduce some of the pages from this booklet.  It is a gem.