Walnut Rounds


With a Taste Reminiscent of Rich Shortbread

INGREDIENTS:

1 cup (2 sticks) butter, softened
1/2 cup confectioners’ sugar
1 egg yolk, from a large egg
1/4 TSP. salt
1 TSP. vanilla
2-1/2 cups sifted flour
1-1/4 cups finely chopped walnuts

DIRECTIONS:

In a large mixing bowl, beat together the butter, sugar, egg yolk, salt and vanilla until thoroughly blended and fluffy. With a wooden spoon, gradually mix in the flour, then the nuts. Chill for 1/2 an hour or so.

On a floured pastry cloth, with a floured stockinette-covered rolling pin, roll out 1/4 of the dough at a time so that it is about 1/4″ thick.

Keep remaining dough refrigerated. Cut out with a 2″ round cookie cutter. Place about 1″ apart on ungreased cookie sheets.

Bake in a pre-heated 350° oven until lightly browned – about 10 minutes. While still warm, roll in extra confectioners’ sugar. Cool completely. Store in a tightly covered container between sheets of wax paper. Makes about 5 dozen.

posted by Mountain Republic                                                                 recipe by: unknown

Snickerdoodles

A snickerdoodle is a type of cookie made with butter, shortening or oil, sugar and flour, then rolled in cinnamon and sugar. Eggs may also sometimes be used as an ingredient. Snickerdoodles are characterized by a cracked surface and can be crisp or soft depending on preference. In modern recipes, the leavening agent is frequently baking powder. This is in contrast with the traditional technique of utilizing baking soda and cream of tartar, which we will use today.

Snickerdoodles can be referred to as “sugar cookies.” However, traditional sugar cookies are often rolled in white sugar after baking, whereas snickerdoodles are rolled in a mixture of white sugar and cinnamon before baking.

The Joy of Cooking claims that snickerdoodles are probably German in origin, and that the name is a corruption of the German word Schneckennudeln (lit. “snail noodles”), a kind of pastry. A different author suggests that the word “snicker” comes from the German word Schnecke, which describe a snail shape. Yet another hypothesis suggests that the name has no particular meaning or purpose and is simply a whimsically named cookie that originated from a New England tradition of fanciful cookie names.

These cookies tend to puff up at first and then flatten out. Hope you enjoy!

Ingredients:

  • 2-3/4 cups sifted flour
  • 2 TSP. cream of tartar
  • 1 TSP. baking soda
  • 1/4 TSP. salt
  • 1/2 cup soft shortening
  • 1/2 cup soft butter
  • 1-1/2 cups sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 3 TSP. cinnamon and 3 TBSP. sugar (mix together & set aside)

Directions:

  • Turn on oven to 400°
  • Mix the shortening/butter, sugar and eggs well.
  • Sift together the dry ingredients and stir in.
  • Mix well by hand. Mixture will be light and fluffy.
  • Roll into balls about the size of small walnuts.
  • Roll balls in the mixture of cinnamon & sugar.
  • Place 2″ apart on an ungreased cookie sheet.
  • Bake 8 -10 minutes until lightly browned, but still soft.
  • Wait 2 minutes for cookies to set, then place on a wire rack to cool.
  • Makes about 5 dozen 2″ cookies

posted by Mountain Republic                                 recipe source unknown

contains content from: Wikipedia

Pecan Butter Cookies

These pecan butter cookies are easy to make & even easier to eat! Enjoy!

PECAN BUTTER COOKIES

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup sifted flour
  • 1/4 tsp. salt
  • 1/2 cup unsalted butter
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1/2 tsp. vanilla
  • 3/4 cup finely chopped pecans

Sift together the flour and salt. Cream butter, sugar and vanilla. Add flour and mix until blended. Add pecans and stir to distribute evenly. Chill if necessary to handle dough easily. Shape into one inch balls and place a few inches apart on an ungreased cookie sheet. Bake in a slow oven (325 degrees) for about 25 minutes. Remove from oven and place on wire rack. Cookies, while still warm, may be rolled in confectioner’s sugar or a mixture of granulated sugar and cinnamon. Makes about 2 1/2 dozen.

posted by Mountain Republic                                                    recipe by Amy Chenevert