Random Tuesdays: Roasted Garlic + Roasted Garlic Butter

Never tried it with Parmesan cheese! Sounds great! Thanks for sharing!

piping dreams

Oh, garlic. How we love you. How you make any and every dish sing. How you beguile us with your charms, seeping out of our pores like some noxious gas, all the while making us believe that we do, in fact, smell attractive to those in our immediate vicinity. We choose to believe it.

Here’s the thing. When you infest my fridge in droves, like, in 600,000 cloves? I can’t seem to use you fast enough. You start…sprouting. And you become less than you were meant to be.

It is my hope that by roasting you, mashing you and spreading you, I can make you presentable and delectable once again. Please do understand.

I hope things can be right between us.

Always and ever yours,

L

Roasted Garlic + (Butter)

2 heads garlic

olive oil

4 tablespoons butter

1/8 cup grated parmesan

Preheat oven to 400° F.

Peel the garlic…

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Bacon and Cheese Biscuits


Ran across this recipe over at Zoom Yummy. I made these biscuits a while back and they were absolutely delicious. It’s  about time to make them again. They are so darn good! 

 

 

Here are the ingredients:

And here’s the bacon.

It’s a crucial part of the magic.

1. To make your own Bacon and Cheese Biscuits, first preheat the oven to 390°F (200°C).

2. Then slice the bacon thinly.

3. In a large pan, fry the bacon over moderate heat until crisp.

This will take a couple of minutes.

4. When beautifully crispy, remove the bacon from the pan and crumble it finely.

5. Grab the cheese and grate it.

Just like this.

This is a lot of cheese.

The cheese mostly will constitute the flavor of your biscuits. So choose the one you really like.

It’s completely up to you.

I used Leerdammer. Next time I’ll try Cheddar, I think.

It’s fun because the biscuits can be different every time.

6. Now we need a large bowl.

Using a pastry cutter (or just a fork), combine the flour, baking powder, salt, cayenne pepper and butter until crumbs form.

7. Stir in the grated cheese and the bacon.

8. Then add the milk…

9. …and stir together just until the dry ingredients are well moistened.

10. Transfer the dough onto a lightly floured surface and  knead the dough 4 – 5 times.

To make the biscuits perfectly soft, the trick is not to over-knead the dough.

11. Roll it out to about 1/2 inch (1 cm) thickness.

When it gets sticky use some flour to make the job easier.

12. Cut out rounds using a 2-inch (5 cm) cutter.

Pat the scraps together, re-roll them and cut out some more rounds.

13. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

Arrange your biscuits on the sheet about 1/2 inch (2.5 cm) apart.

14. And bake them for about 15 minutes.

These are so yummy. Enjoy, dear friends!

 

 
posted by Mountain Republic                                  recipe via: ZoomYummy

Top Hat Soufflé

A soufflé is a light baked cake made with egg yolks and beaten egg whites combined with various other ingredients and served as a savory main dish or sweetened as a dessert. The word soufflé is the past participle of the French verb souffler which means “to blow up” or more loosely “puff up”—an apt description of what happens to this combination of custard and egg whites.

Ingredients:

  • 1/4 cup butter or margarine (1/2 stick)
  • 1/2 cup flour
  • 2 cups yellow cream style corn
  • 1/3 cup milk
  • 1/4 TSP. salt
  • 1/8 TSP. garlic salt
  • 1/2 TSP. Worcestershire sauce
  • 1-1/2 cups shredded Cheddar cheese
  • 1/2 cup shredded Provolone cheese
  • 5 large egg yolks, slightly beaten
  • 5 large egg whites, stiffly beaten

Directions:

  • Preheat oven to 350°
  • In a heavy saucepan, melt the butter and blend in flour until smooth.
  • Add corn, milk, salt, garlic salt and Worcestershire sauce and cook, stirring constantly until thickened.
  • Add both cheeses and stir until melted.
  • Blend egg yolks into sauce.
  • Cool slightly.
  • Gently stir 1/4 of egg whites into cheese sauce.
  • Carefully fold remaining egg whites into sauce until just blended.
  • Pour into ungreased 2 quart casserole dish.
  • Bake at 350° for 45 – 50 minutes.

posted by Mountain Republic                                        recipe by unknown

contains content from: Wikipedia

Fruit Fondant Candies

“Fondant” candy is made from a thick, creamy sugar paste. Fondant is also one of several kinds of icing-like substances that are used to decorate cakes and sculpt pastries. In French, the word fondant means “melting”. These candies will definitely melt in your mouth!

Ingredients and Preparation:

  • 1/4 cup mashed potatoes
  • 1 TSP. butter
  • few grains of salt
  • 2 cups sifted powdered sugar
  • 1/2 cup coconut
  • 1/2 cup nuts
  • 1/2 cup candied fruit
  • food coloring* (optional)

Mix the mashed potatoes, butter and salt. Stir in the powdered sugar and beat well.

Fold in the coconut, nuts and candied fruit. Drop by spoonfuls onto waxed paper.

*Tip from DF: A few drops of food coloring can be added so the candies match a theme or holiday.

posted by Mountain Republic                                    recipe by Vida Slater


Shrove Tuesday Discovery: My Brit Ancestors Ate Pancakes Topped with Sugar and Lemon, Oh My

Photo Elliot Smith - the GUARDIAN

In perusing the UK’s Telegraph (no recipe just a discussion about the auld pancake of yore) and the Guardian this fine Shrove Tuesday, I made a shocking discovery for an American in love with fluffy pancakes topped with butter and syrup:  My Great Grandmother enjoyed thin pancakes (like the French) topped with lemon and sugar.  Brits wax very sentimental about these.

The Guardian provides an overview of the development of the British pancake going back to 1594.  That seems far enough when most humans can’t trace their lineage back more than a few generations.

…[M]odern pancakes are descended from those specifically designed to use up fat before the beginning of Lent, which means they tend to be heavier on the eggs and butter than, say, the fluffy American stack, or the squat Russian blini.

Forewarned is forearmed as they say.  Don’t look to these for any dietary benefit only taste.

Here is a website that will help you convert metric measurements.  Learn to do this because we are going global.

As for the pancakes, the key to remember is this.  The first pancake is always a mess.  That’s just how it is for all of us.  So let the cook eat the first one.  Looks bad; tastes good.  From the Guardian:

Makes about 8

125g plain flour
Pinch of salt
1 egg plus 1 egg yolk
225ml whole or semi-skimmed milk
Small knob of butter

1. Sift the flour in a large mixing bowl and add a pinch of salt. Make a well in the centre, and pour the egg and the yolk into it. Mix the milk with 2 tbsp water and then pour a little in with the egg and beat together.

2. Whisk the flour into the liquid ingredients, drawing it gradually into the middle until you have a smooth paste the consistency of double cream. Whisk the rest of the milk in until the batter is more like single cream. Cover and refrigerate for at least half an hour.

3. Heat the butter in a frying pan on a medium-high heat – you only need enough fat to just grease the bottom of the pan. It should be hot enough that the batter sizzles when it hits it.

4. Spread a small ladleful of batter across the bottom of the pan, quickly swirling to coat. Tip any excess away. When it begins to set, loosen the edges with a thin spatula or palette knife, and when it begins to colour on the bottom, flip it over with the same instrument and cook for another 30 seconds. (If you’re feeling cocky, you can also toss the pancake after loosening it: grasp the handle firmly with both hands, then jerk the pan up and slightly towards you.)

5. Pancakes are best eaten as soon as possible, before they go rubbery, but if you’re cooking for a crowd, keep them separate until you’re ready to serve by layering them up between pieces of kitchen roll [could be parchment paper – I wouldn’t use waxed].

Homemade Macaroni & Cheese

This may just be one of my favorite dinners. Forget about that stuff in a box they call “The Cheesiest”.  This dish is made the old-fashioned way – with REAL cheese. And the sharper the cheese, the better! I like using Extra Sharp Cheddar for this recipe, but just about any kind of cheese that melts will work just fine.

This dish can easily be altered to fit your family’s own tastes. Some cooked ground beef or sausage, chopped vegetables etc. can be added to give this recipe a little variety.

INGREDIENTS:

  • 8 ounces elbow macaroni
  • 2 cups shredded Sharp Cheddar Cheese
  • 4 tablespoons butter
  • 1 egg
  • 1/2 cup milk
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1 cup buttered fresh bread crumbs* (if desired)

Preparation:

Boil macaroni in salted water. Rinse with cold water and drain well.

Cover the bottom of a 2-quart baking dish with layer of cooked macaroni, a layer of shredded cheese, bits of butter, salt and pepper to taste.

Continue making layers until all the ingredients are used, ending with a cheese layer on top.

Whisk the milk, egg & cayenne together and pour over the top. Cover with buttered bread crumbs, if desired.

Bake in a 350° oven for 25 to 35 minutes or until browned and cooked through. Makes 4 to 6 servings.

*An easy way to make fresh bread crumbs is to process 2 slices of bread in a food processor, mix in 2 to 3 teaspoons of butter and you’re done.

posted by Mountain Republic