Taste the Rainbow Cake

For my daughter’s birthday, by special request, I made a rainbow cake.  It turned out really well.  I followed the directions I found over on this blog:

how to make a rainbow cake!

 

I didn’t use the diet recipe because my 6 year old isn’t on a diet but that recipe does look super simple.  Smile  I just followed the standard directions on the box mix I used. 

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Mixing the colors was fun.  Finding enough bowls to mix them in was a pain!  LOL  I didn’t mix the basic cake mix much at all, just a rough mix, since I knew the batter was going to get a longer mixing once I added in the colors.  Then I divided into 6 roughly equal portions.  I ended up with about 1 and 1/3 c. of batter per color.  I used about 24 “dots” of gel for each color as well.  The orange and purple you have to design yourself but I found that about a 3-1 ratio of yellow to red made a good orange, and the same for blue to red made a decent purple.

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I followed the recipe creator’s instruction to use a greater amount of the bottom colors first, and also to reverse them in the pans.

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I needed to bake mine a little longer than the box called for (about 5-8 min), probably because I was using 2 boxes of cake mix, like the recipe called for.  My cakes seemed more brown than the creator’s did, but I also used the egg whites and oil in mine so that may account for some of that golden color too.

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Once it was done though, and we cut into it, the vibrancy of the colors really came through! 

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The pudding/Cool Whip frosting mix tasted really good but it was just a tad sticky to work with.  I recommend pushing the frosting.  It’s a technique I was taught many years ago.  You put a big glob of frosting on the middle of your cake and then spread it by gently pushing small areas of the glob away from the center rather than adding small globs a little at a time and pulling them toward you.  Don’t try to “smear” the frosting or you’ll tear your cake.

Also, I opted to simply invert my bottom layer when I assembled it, rather than slicing some off to make it level. 

It was so much easier than I thought it would be, the hardest part really was just mixing the colors over and over because that got a little old and repetitious because I did it by hand but otherwise, it was lots of fun, and the “ooh!” factor from my kids was the best part.  Open-mouthed smile

Okay, I “oohed!” too.  Winking smile

from DF with love 🙂

Cross-posted at Nessipes 

Ohio Shaker Lemon Pie

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I found this recipe when I was looking for a post for my personal blog.  I received a few requests for the recipe, so here it is.  Smile  Doesn’t it look delicious?  I can’t vouch for it personally … yet.  Give me time though!  If you decide to make it, please leave a comment and let me know what you think!

Here’s where I found the recipe and picture:
Bounteous bites: Ohio Shaker lemon pie: A whole lot of lemon and a little bit more.

Ohio Shaker lemon pie
(adapted from
Epicurious)
300-400 g pâte brisée (a fancy way of saying pie dough; the Epicurious link above has a recipe for that)
2 lemons
4 dl sugar (1 ¾ cups)
4 big eggs
1/4 tsp salt

  1. Blanch the lemons for 30 seconds in a large saucepan of boiling water, then drain them and rinse under cold water.
  2. Cut off the ends of the lemons, discarding them and then cut the lemons cross-wise into paper-thin slices (I used an electrical slicer, but a lot of patience and a sharp knife can complete the mission, too). Remove the seeds.
  3. Put the lemon slices into a bowl, trying to collect all the juice that has flown out of them. Cover with sugar and let the mixture stand for one whole day, stirring after the 1st hour.
  4. Next day roll out half the dough on a lightly floured surface and fit it into a 22-24 cm (8-9 in) pie plate, leaving an overhang.
  5. Remove the lemon slices from the liquid that has formed to the bowl and arrange them in the pie shell.
  6. Add the eggs and salt to the sugar, whisk until combined well and pour the mixture over the lemon slices.
  7. Roll out the remaining dough so that it would also leave an overhang. Cover the pie with it and fold the overhang under the bottom crust, pressing the edge to seal it.
  8. Cut slits in the crust with a sharp knife, forming steam vents, and bake for 35 minutes in the middle of the oven at 220C (425°F).
  9. Reduce temperature to 175C (350°F) and bake for 20-25 minutes more, or until the crust is golden.
  10. Let the pie cool and serve it at room temperature. I’d definitely say a heap of ice cream is a must!

Traditional Lamb Cake Recipe from Griswold Vintage Mold Insert

Now that Easter is not really so far off as we would imagine, if you remember lamb cakes from your childhood or are fortunate to have someone or a bakery make one now, you are very fortunate but you can easily learn to prepare one  yourself.  All you will need is a lamb cake mold  of your choice – new or used or antique.One famous mold is the Griswold 866 (no longer manufactured).  Ebay is a good source for the vintage Griswold mold manufactured by an Erie, PA company that is now defunct.  There is one for sale today for $149 or best offer and another at auction starting at $55.  You need to shop around.  Go to this page to learn more about the Griswold  molds and to know the ones from their line that are best.

NOTE:  You do not have to use the Griswold mold or any other cast iron mold.  Heavy aluminum is OK and good success is being experienced by people using the  lighter aluminum molds.  That gives you a range of prices and sources for molds.

Here are photos of my Griswold mold that I bought on eBay a few years ago, still in its original box.

The mold comes in two parts. The two parts are NOT attached

The back piece below has vent holes (see the one in the head).

There was an insert that came with this mold that had the recipe for the lamb cake.  These inserts, (like the one below) are sold on eBay but the internet has several sources for just the recipe.

Here is the classic recipe that came with the mold in an insert like the one pictured above in the purple frame.  This is from a wonderful site found here. It includes the recipe for the icing.  I can confirm as a former librarian that the text at this site and in my insert are identical.

The key to a successful lamb cake is a carefully seasoned mold.

Cast-iron baking molds must be seasoned before being used for the first time, and re-seasoned as necessary. This helps seal the pores of the metal to prevent sticking. Here is a larger picture of a well-seasoned cast-iron lamb mold.

  1. To season a brand-new cast-iron mold or pan, heat oven to 300 degrees. Thoroughly wash the cast-iron in hot, soapy water. Rinse and dry thoroughly. Apply a liberal coat of solid vegetable shortening to every nook and cranny. Place on a baking sheet, open side up, and heat 1 hour. Cool, pour off any remaining shortening, and wipe clean with a paper towel. DO NOT WASH!
  2. Before pouring in batter, using a pastry brush, apply solid vegetable shortening to every crevice and then flour. Tap out any excess flour. The mold is now ready to be filled. After unmolding the finished product, don’t wash, just wipe the interior with a paper towel and the exterior with a damp cloth.
  3. On subsequent uses of the mold, even though it has been seasoned, before pouring in the batter, the mold must re-greased and heated for 20 minutes at 375 degrees. Reduce the oven temperature to 350 degrees and pour off any accumulated shortening, cool, and re-grease and flour before pouring in the batter. See the instructions for Easter Lamb Cake recipe.
  4. To reseason a mold or pan that is starting to stick, repeat step 1.
  5. To reseason a rusty, old cast-iron mold, heat the oven to 275 degrees. Clean the pan very well, making sure to scrub off any dried/baked on food. Dry it thoroughly and coat liberally with solid vegetable shortening. Bake the pan in the oven for at least 15 minutes. Take the pan out of the oven and pour out the excess shortening. Then put the pan back in the oven for at least 2 more hours. Repeat this process at least twice, more if the pan was really rusty.
  6. DON’T DO THIS:
    • Don’t stack cast-iron molds or pans on top of each other. They will get scratched and lose their stick-free properties.
    • To avoid condensation and, therefore, rust, don’t store cast-iron molds or pans with their lids on.

Even if you never make or eat one of these cakes, the history of holiday baking molds is fascinating.

Old Fashioned Rice Pudding

Here’s a quick & easy recipe for old fashioned rice pudding. As you probably know, all my recipes are quick & easy or I wouldn’t be cooking it! Here we go:

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups cooked white rice
  • 3 eggs
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1/4 TSP. salt
  • 1 TSP. vanilla extract
  • 1/2 cup raisins
  • 3 -1/2 cups milk
  • ground cinnamon

Directions:

Preheat oven to 300°

In a large mixing bowl, add all ingredients, except cinnamon.  Mix well.

Pour mixture into a lightly greased 1-1/2 quart baking dish.  Sprinkle top with cinnamon.

Put baking dish in a pan of hot water in the oven and bake for about 1-1/2 hours or until a knife inserted into the center comes out clean. Can be served warm or cold. Top it with some whipped cream if you like. Enjoy!

recipe by Mountain Republic

Mom Jones’ Cookies

I remember my Mom made these cookies often when I was a kid.  This recipe was from my Grandmother & dated April 1955. I don’t know who Mom Jones’ was or where the recipe originally came from, but I do know these cookies sure are good!

This is definitely one of my favorite cookie recipes and it makes a good, large batch. I’ve baked these cookies for soldiers that I support in Afghanistan several times. The troops have always liked them, since I’ve heard the hard ones make fine projectiles to use on the Taliban!

I’ve made these many times for our family gatherings as well & they always seem to disappear fast. I remember my Mom used coconut more often than raisins, but I like them both ways. If you’re so inclined, you can add both raisins & coconut or cut the fruit out all together. The raisins tend to caramelize a bit in the oven and with the brown sugar, the cookies have a nice chewy texture.

So they don’t get too hard, I only like to bake them about 10 minutes or so. Let them “set” on the cookie sheet for two minutes before removing to cool on a wire rack.

This recipe can easily be cut in half. Enjoy!

INGREDIENTS:

  • 1 cup shortening
  • 1 cup white sugar
  • 1cup brown sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 cups sifted flour
  • 1 tsp. baking powder
  • 1 tsp. baking soda
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 2 tsp. vanilla
  • 1 cup shredded coconut or raisins
  • 1 cup walnuts
  • 2 cups quick oatmeal

PREPARATION:

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Cream shortening & sugars together. Mix well.

Beat in eggs.

Add flour, sifted together with baking powder, baking soda & salt.

Blend in oatmeal, nuts, vanilla & raisins or coconut. Dough will be very stiff.

Drop by rounded teaspoonful onto greased cookie sheet. Bake 10 – 15 minutes or until golden brown. Makes about 8 – 9 dozen cookies, depending on size.

posted by Mountain Republic                            recipe from Amy Chenevert

The Cake Without a Name

I got this recipe when I turned 13 and it has been a favorite of mine ever since.  It’s very rich, and since it’s a chilled dessert, it’s wonderful on those warm summer nights.

Of course, it’s also wonderful on those winter nights too, with a cup of hot coffee or chocolate.  🙂

Begin the day before as this needs to chill overnight and you’ll need time to cool the crust also.

You will need:

  • 13×9 glass pan

Layer 1:

  • 1 c. flour
    ½c margarine or butter
    1 c. chopped pecans – or any nuts but walnuts aren’t very good in this recipe, and neither are peanuts.  An almond/pecan mix is pretty good, and my husband thinks hazelnuts might be good too.

Layer 2:

  • 1 c. sugar
    8 oz. cream cheese
    (half of) 1 lg container of Cool Whip (12 or 16 oz)

Layer 3:

  • 1 lg pkg Jell-o instant chocolate pudding
    1 lg pkg Jell-o instant vanilla pudding
    3 c. milk

Layer 4:

  • remaining half of Cool Whip
    Hershey chocolate bar, plain

To begin:

Layer 1

  • Preheat your over to 350° – this is the only baking you will do for this recipe.
  • If you have a food processor you can use that, or a hand mixer will work great too.  Mix the nuts, butter, and flour to a paste.  It will be lumpy because of the nuts, you’re not looking for nut dust or anything.  Press this mix evenly into the bottom of the cake pan and bake for 20 min.  Allow to cool completely before adding the other layers.

Layer 2

  • Cream together the cream cheese, sugar, and half of the Cool Whip.  Pour onto the cooled crust and spread evenly.

Layer 3

  • Don’t begin this step until you are ready.  If you make it too far in advance, the pudding will set and be very difficult to spread over the previous layer.
  • Combine the pudding mixes with the milk and mix.  Don’t follow the box directions, just pour the dry mixes into a lg bowl, add the milk and mix together.  Before it sets, pour it over the cream cheese layer, and smooth it out evenly.  Allow to set.  Since it’s instant pudding, this will only take a few minutes.  When it’s chilled, go on to the next step.

Layer 4

  • Spread the remaining half of the Cool Whip over the pudding layer.
  • Chill overnight in the fridge.  Just before serving, you can grate (part of) a plain Hershey bar over the top to make little chocolate curls for decoration, or you can add sprinkles of some type but keep in mind they will probably bleed into the topping after a while.  If that is important to you.
  • Now, eat and gain weight.  :)

If you can think of a name for this, let me know!  I was thinking Chocolate Snow Pie, but I’m no good with such things.  :)

 

posted by DarcsFalcon