Cinnamon Pancakes with Blueberry Syrup

BlueberriesThis recipe was submitted by a friend who says, “These cinnamon pancakes with blueberry syrup were served to us at a bed and breakfast in the Midwest this past summer. I’m glad I asked them for the recipe and they were generous enough to provide it. I told the proprietor that I was going to pass the recipe around and they were quite pleased. So here it is.”

INGREDIENTS:

2-1/4 cups flour
2 TBSP sugar
1 TSP cinnamon
2 TSP baking powder
1 TSP baking soda
1/2 TSP salt
2-1/2 cups buttermilk
6 TBSP butter (melted)
2 eggs ( at room temperature)
1 cup maple syrup
1 cinnamon stick
2/3 cup fresh blueberries

DIRECTIONS:

Whisk together the flour, sugar, cinnamon, baking powder, baking soda, and salt in a large bowl. In a separate bowl, whisk together the buttermilk, melted butter and eggs.

Make a well in the center of the flour mixture and whisk in the wet ingredients until just combined, with some small lumps.

Heat a non-stick griddle or electric frying pan over medium high heat until a drop of water sizzles when splashed on the pan. Brush the griddle with melted butter. Pour 1/4 cupful of batter onto the griddle per pancake, leaving space between the pancakes. When bubbles form all over the edges of the pancakes and they release easily, flip the pancakes with a spatula.

Cook on the other side until the pancakes are evenly pale golden, about 2 to 3 minutes more. Repeat, adding a little more butter to the griddle as needed.

Meanwhile, heat the syrup and cinnamon stick over medium-low heat until warm and fragrant. Lower the heat, stir in the blueberries and leave over low heat until the blueberries are just warmed, but still hold their shape, about 1 minute. Serve over warm pancakes and enjoy!

posted by Mountain Republic

Shrove Tuesday Discovery: My Brit Ancestors Ate Pancakes Topped with Sugar and Lemon, Oh My

Photo Elliot Smith - the GUARDIAN

In perusing the UK’s Telegraph (no recipe just a discussion about the auld pancake of yore) and the Guardian this fine Shrove Tuesday, I made a shocking discovery for an American in love with fluffy pancakes topped with butter and syrup:  My Great Grandmother enjoyed thin pancakes (like the French) topped with lemon and sugar.  Brits wax very sentimental about these.

The Guardian provides an overview of the development of the British pancake going back to 1594.  That seems far enough when most humans can’t trace their lineage back more than a few generations.

…[M]odern pancakes are descended from those specifically designed to use up fat before the beginning of Lent, which means they tend to be heavier on the eggs and butter than, say, the fluffy American stack, or the squat Russian blini.

Forewarned is forearmed as they say.  Don’t look to these for any dietary benefit only taste.

Here is a website that will help you convert metric measurements.  Learn to do this because we are going global.

As for the pancakes, the key to remember is this.  The first pancake is always a mess.  That’s just how it is for all of us.  So let the cook eat the first one.  Looks bad; tastes good.  From the Guardian:

Makes about 8

125g plain flour
Pinch of salt
1 egg plus 1 egg yolk
225ml whole or semi-skimmed milk
Small knob of butter

1. Sift the flour in a large mixing bowl and add a pinch of salt. Make a well in the centre, and pour the egg and the yolk into it. Mix the milk with 2 tbsp water and then pour a little in with the egg and beat together.

2. Whisk the flour into the liquid ingredients, drawing it gradually into the middle until you have a smooth paste the consistency of double cream. Whisk the rest of the milk in until the batter is more like single cream. Cover and refrigerate for at least half an hour.

3. Heat the butter in a frying pan on a medium-high heat – you only need enough fat to just grease the bottom of the pan. It should be hot enough that the batter sizzles when it hits it.

4. Spread a small ladleful of batter across the bottom of the pan, quickly swirling to coat. Tip any excess away. When it begins to set, loosen the edges with a thin spatula or palette knife, and when it begins to colour on the bottom, flip it over with the same instrument and cook for another 30 seconds. (If you’re feeling cocky, you can also toss the pancake after loosening it: grasp the handle firmly with both hands, then jerk the pan up and slightly towards you.)

5. Pancakes are best eaten as soon as possible, before they go rubbery, but if you’re cooking for a crowd, keep them separate until you’re ready to serve by layering them up between pieces of kitchen roll [could be parchment paper – I wouldn’t use waxed].

Best Recipe for Crepes – Laura Seacord Cookbook, Canada

I am one fortunate lady. I grew up in a suburb of Rochester, NY. Rochester was the  home of Fanny Farmer Candies.  In my typical middle-class  neighborhood filled with kids, among our neighbors was a Canadian family. They were there because the father was president of Fanny Farmer Candies.

Vintage Fanny Farmer Large Butter Cream Easter Egg Box

Later the family would return to Canada where our neighbor became head of Laura Secord.  Fanny Farmer is pretty well reduced in size to a few stores throughout the US and  has had many owners over the years. But for  you who always loved Fanny Farmer – including those large butter cream Easter Eggs – the dream lives.  Laura Secord has them. They are boxed differently but they are still there!  Some stores will mail to the US, others will not. It is their corporate policy not to do so.  Check their website for store locations and you may find one near you.

One of the projects our neighbor had was coming out with the first Canadian cook book the Laura Secord Canadian Cook Book (1966) and I have a copy (1973). It periodically comes back into print but is available from used and rare book dealers.  I was foraging for a recipe that would come close to the crepes a Dutch woman used to make for me when I picked up the Laura Secord Cook Book.  I tried a recipe I found there and was in heaven. Look in the index under “pancakes” because “crepe” means pancake – not the fluffy American but their wafer-thin French cousins.  You cannot surpass the consistency of a crepe.

Laura Secord French Pancakes (crepes)

Preheat heavy 6″ fry pan and brush with melted butter (I use olive oil because it doesn’t smoke).

Sift or blend together:

1 Cup all-purpose flour.
1 teaspoon sugar
1/4 teaspoon salt

Beat together with a rotary beater

3 eggs
2 cups milk

Cover and chill for one hour.

Pour batter onto preheated pan using about 2 tablespoons batter for each pancake (cook singly).  Tip the pan to coat with a thin layer. Turn when brown to brown other side.

Roll up and serve hot with butter, maple syrup or molasses (the old Canadian way).