Lemon Sponge Cake

A nice & light Lemon Sponge Cake from one of my Grandmother’s handwritten recipes. This one really couldn’t be any quicker or any easier.  Here we go:

Ingredients and Preparation:

  • 1 package Duncan Hines “Lemon Supreme” Cake Mix
  • 1 cup water
  • 1/2 cup vegetable oil
  • 1 package Jello Instant Lemon Pudding Mix
  • 4 eggs

Disregard directions on the cake mix box. Combine all ingredients in a bowl and beat well with electric mixer. Pour mixture into well greased tube pan.

Bake 55 minutes at 350°. Let cool. Remove from pan to finish cooling.

posted by Mountain Republic                                        recipe by Ruth Hagen

Christmas Salad

This hand-written recipe from my Mom was dated Xmas 1952. I remember that my Aunt loved this Christmas Salad recipe & she always served it at her Christmas dinners. On the lower corner of the index card, my Mom scribbled the word “delish!” Hope you enjoy.

Merry Christmas to all from Mountain Republic!

Christmas Salad

INGREDIENTS:

  • 1 box Lime Jello
  • 1 box Cherry Jello
  • 1 can crushed pineapple
  • 1 jar Bing salad cherries, pitted
  • 1 cup chopped nuts (if desired)
  • whipped cream or Cool Whip etc.
  • red or green Maraschino cherries

PREPARATION:

  • Prepare Lime Jello according to directions on package, except use the pineapple juice in place of part of the water.
  • Add the pineapple (& nuts if desired) to the Lime Jello.
  • Prepare Cherry Jello according to directions on package, except use the Bing cherry juice in place of part of the water.
  • Add the pitted Bing cherries to the Cherry Jello.
  • Mold in separate layers. Chill.
  • Top with whipped cream.
  • Garnish with green or red Maraschino cherry.

posted by Mountain Republic

 

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Mo’s Plum Pudding

Like SamHenry, my maternal Grandmother was also from Britain. She was born in Edinburgh, Scotland in 1885 and moved to London where she resided until the end of World War 1.

At the end of  the “war to end all wars”, she married my Grandfather and moved to the United States, bringing along her recipe box filled with instructions for preparing traditional English fare.

Every Christmas my Grandmother would spend days & days in the kitchen, baking cookies, fruit cakes & plum pudding as gifts for her family and friends.

Plum pudding was traditionally made in a “bag” & hung for weeks prior to Christmas to enhance the flavor. By the time I came on the scene, my Grandmother had adopted the pudding can* since she liked to make several small puddings to give away as presents.

You can’t get much more traditional English fare at the Christmas holiday than than a good plum pudding.


Mo’s Plum Pudding

INGREDIENTS:

  • 3 cups sifted flour
  • 1 TSP. baking powder
  • 1 TSP. salt
  • 1 TSP. cloves
  • 1 TSP. all spice
  • 1 TSP. nutmeg
  • 2 TSP. cinnamon
  • 1/2 TSP. ginger
  • 1 package brown sugar
  • 1 # chopped beef (suet)
  • 1 package currants
  • 2 # seedless grapes
  • 1 package seeded raisins
  • 1 # chopped, mixed peel
  • slivered almonds, blanched
  • 6 beaten eggs
  • 1 can apple sauce
  • 1 TSP. molasses
  • 1 TSP. almond extract, grated lemon rinds or essence of lemon
  • 1 cup of broth. Can be water, cider or fruit juice

PREPARATION:

  • Mix all ingredients together
  • Grease bottoms and sides of pudding cans*
  • Put wax paper in bottom of cans
  • Fill cans with mixture and cover top with wax paper
  • Steam for about 6 hours or more in roasting pan, with water halfway up side of cans
  • Add boiling water about every hour
  • Remove from water, place on rack and leave covers off cans overnight

*Don’t have any “pudding cans”? Wash & save a few empty soup cans from your kitchen. Recycle – that’s what your Grandma did!

posted by Mountain Republic                                 recipe by Amy Chenevert


Eccles Cakes also Known as Coventry Godcakes and etc.

Traditions at Christmas in England  –

My maternal Great Grandmother was from Coventry, England in the Midlands.  Like any other region, they had their specialties.  Eccles cakes are a speciality from this region.  This recipe has been taken from a remarkable cookbook described under the tab “Browse Books.”

Good Things in England
Florence White
Jonathan Cape, 1932 (current edition published by Persephone Books

From the cookbook:

Eccles cakes, Banbury cakes, Coventry Godcakes, Hawkshead cake and Chorley cakes all belong to the same class. They consist of pastry, short or puff as the case may be, round in the case of Eccles and Chorley, which are much about the same size, and in the case of the Hawkshead cake which is as large as a plate; but at Coventry taking the form of an isosceles triangle, and at Banbury made in the oval shape of a rather wide shuttle.

Each and all are filled with a special mixture partaking of the character of the mincemeat we put in pies at Christmas time.

Here is a recipe for Eccles cakes. These have been made for the Eccles “wakes” from time immemorial. A pretty story is told about these cakes. It is said Mrs Raffald gave her own recipe as a wedding present to a servant girl who had served her well and was going to live at Eccles, and that the girl made and sold the cake so successfully that she made a fortune.

Bradburn’s, Eccles, today is advertised as “The only Old Original Eccles Cake Shop. Never removed. On the site of these Premises Eccles Cakes were first made. Rebuilt 1835.” [They are at any rate about the best I have tasted, and those sold at the old cottage opposite Eccles Cross where William Deacon’s Bank now stands were made and baked at Bradburn’s. The cottage had no ovens].

Recipe: Lancashire, 1904

Some short pastry
For the filling:
¼lb currants
1oz finely chopped peel
½ teaspoonful allspice and nutmeg
2oz sugar
1oz butter

Time: to heat and cool mixture about 20 to 30 minutes; to bake cakes 10 to 15 minutes in a hot oven.

1. Put all the ingredients for the mixture into a pan and heat for a few minutes, then turn into a basin to cool.

2. Roll out short pastry (this is nicest if made of lard) to about ¼ inch thickness.

3. Cut into rounds.

4. Place a good tablespoon of the mixture on each round.

5. Gather up the edges, turn over and press with rolling-pin into flat cake; make a hole in the centre of the top crust.

6. Place on baking sheet 10 to 15 minutes in a hot oven.

7. Sprinkle with castor sugar when cakes are cooked.

• These extracts are taken from Good Things in England by Florence White (Persephone, £10)

Best Recipe for Crepes – Laura Seacord Cookbook, Canada

I am one fortunate lady. I grew up in a suburb of Rochester, NY. Rochester was the  home of Fanny Farmer Candies.  In my typical middle-class  neighborhood filled with kids, among our neighbors was a Canadian family. They were there because the father was president of Fanny Farmer Candies.

Vintage Fanny Farmer Large Butter Cream Easter Egg Box

Later the family would return to Canada where our neighbor became head of Laura Secord.  Fanny Farmer is pretty well reduced in size to a few stores throughout the US and  has had many owners over the years. But for  you who always loved Fanny Farmer – including those large butter cream Easter Eggs – the dream lives.  Laura Secord has them. They are boxed differently but they are still there!  Some stores will mail to the US, others will not. It is their corporate policy not to do so.  Check their website for store locations and you may find one near you.

One of the projects our neighbor had was coming out with the first Canadian cook book the Laura Secord Canadian Cook Book (1966) and I have a copy (1973). It periodically comes back into print but is available from used and rare book dealers.  I was foraging for a recipe that would come close to the crepes a Dutch woman used to make for me when I picked up the Laura Secord Cook Book.  I tried a recipe I found there and was in heaven. Look in the index under “pancakes” because “crepe” means pancake – not the fluffy American but their wafer-thin French cousins.  You cannot surpass the consistency of a crepe.

Laura Secord French Pancakes (crepes)

Preheat heavy 6″ fry pan and brush with melted butter (I use olive oil because it doesn’t smoke).

Sift or blend together:

1 Cup all-purpose flour.
1 teaspoon sugar
1/4 teaspoon salt

Beat together with a rotary beater

3 eggs
2 cups milk

Cover and chill for one hour.

Pour batter onto preheated pan using about 2 tablespoons batter for each pancake (cook singly).  Tip the pan to coat with a thin layer. Turn when brown to brown other side.

Roll up and serve hot with butter, maple syrup or molasses (the old Canadian way).

Dust off the Waffle Iron. It’s Time to Get Saturday Night Serious

This is an old-fashioned cast-iron waffle iron for making waffles using a stove burner. To purchase one, click on the picture.

Having watched our politicians waffle on this tax extension matter (among many matters) I would like to make some waffles this Saturday night, name them after the worst political wafflers and BITE THEM!

The following recipes came from a little notebook kept by my paternal grandmother’s cook.   They date from the 1930s-40s – times like our own now.

Plain Waffles

  1. 2 cups Flour
  2. 2 teaspoons Baking powder
  3. 1/2 teaspoon Salt
  4. 3 eggs Eggs
  5. 1 cup Milk
  6. 4 tablespoons melted Shortening
  • Sift flour once, measure. Add baking powder and salt. Sift again.
  • Beat egg yolks and combine with milk and melted shortening.  Add gradually to the first mixture beating until smooth and creamy.
  • Beat egg whites until stiff.  Fold in gently to the above.
  • Bake in waffle iron.
  • Makes four 4-section waffles.

Next:  Fora change,  select your favorite waffle or try making some of each – a waffle worshiper would do nothing other than this.

  • Graham waffles – Use graham in place of white flour.  Because graham is not to be sifted, add dry ingredients from the basic recipe and blend very thoroughly before combining with the liquids also from the basic recipe.
  • Cheese waffles – add from 3/4 to 1 cup grated American cheese to plain waffle batter, stirring it in just before adding the beaten egg whites.  These waffles are delicious served with broiled bacon or with grilled tomatoes.

Rice Waffles

  1. 1 and 3/4 cups flour
  2. 2 tsp baking powder
  3. 1 teaspoon salt
  4. 3/4 cup cold cooked rice
  5. 2 eggs
  6. 2 Tbs sugar
  7. 1 and 1/2 cups milk
  8. 4 Tbs melted shortening
  • Sift flour.  Add baking powder, salt and sift again.
  • Add the rice and blend with a fork.
  • Beat the egg yolks and sugar. Combine with milk and melted shortening.
  • Combine the above two mixtures.
  • Beat until perfectly smooth.
  • Beat egg whites until stiff and fold into the two combined mixtures.
  • Bake in hot waffle iron. Makes 6 four-sectioned waffles.

Holiday Cranberry Relish Recipe

Ever since I was a little kid (and that was a while back), we had always eaten canned cranberries with our holiday meals. I remember always looking forward to eating that jello-like substance with my annual turkey dinner.

But over the years, my taste for that cranberry gel seems to have diminished. And lately, my wife & I have enjoyed cooking several birds throughout the year. We cook (or sometimes smoke) the bird, have a nice meal & then freeze the rest for turkey sandwiches.

Can-berry in it's not so natural state.

A few years ago, I ran across this recipe for homemade Holiday Cranberry Relish. It’s supposed to be from a chef in San Francisco and it is absolutely delicious! It makes me want to cook more turkey so I can make more of this relish! It’s so good, I find myself eating it all by itself! And it’s really easy to make. This relish is now a regular part our holiday meals. If you enjoy this recipe, you may want to freeze a bag or two of cranberries for use later in the year.

Holiday Cranberry Relish in it's natural state. Just a bit more appealing.

Cranberry Relish:

  • 2 cups washed raw cranberries
  • 2 skinned and cored tart apples
  • 1 large, whole (peel ON) seedless orange, cut into sections
  • 1 to 2 cups granulated sugar (depending on how sweet you want your relish to be)

This recipe calls for the use of an old fashioned hand turn grinder. If you don’t have a grinder, you can use a food processor instead.

Make sure to cut the orange and apples into small chunks before chopping. Use short pulses when using the food processor or your relish will turn out mushy. After chopping the orange, apples & cranberries, pick out any oversize chunks for re-chopping.

Add sugar to taste. I like my relish a little tart, so I use about one and a half cups of sugar. After adding the sugar, make sure to let the relish stand at room temperature for 45 minutes to an hour to let the sugar dissolve.

This relish keeps in the fridge for about a week and also freezes well. It’s really great on turkey sandwiches!!

Source: Cranberry Relish Recipe

posted by Mountain Republic

The Best of a Pumpkin Pie Within Reach of a Diet for My Dog and Me

Nap in the afternoon sun.

Yes, my dog, Impulse (Imp) and I are on diets.  We are of course both cheating.  She wakes me up in the middle of the night for a treat and I give her one to put her back to sleep.  Then I have a snack myself, lie guilty and awake in bed and finally drift back to sleep. As you know, sleep deprivation contributes to over eating and etc.

Imp’s vet told me to give her canned pumpkin (plain) in addition to her food to help her feel full but without the calories of her regular food.  Well, thought I, what’s good for the JRT must be good for me.

I remembered my late cousin Cathrine, a delightful soul who hailed from Alabama and, as a grandmother herself, passed along many fine old southern recipes.  Her big, secret ingredient for just about everything was peanut butter.  She put it in squash and in eggplant casserole.  For her husband, my cousin, it was garlic, garlic, garlic (no peanut butter).  Cathy taught me how to tame Pumpkin Pie.  You make it as a pudding not a pie.

So I got some canned pumpkin for both Imp and me!  But for me, I also bought skimmed condensed milk and a bag of 1/2 sugar and 1/2 Splenda.  I did not make a pie crust.  Instead, I put the “revised” filling mix in a deep circular Pyrex dish I have (I also use an old plum pudding basin) and baked it per pie instructions. [Also check cooking instructions for other puddings such as chocolate!]  As in a pie or other pudding, a knife inserted into the middle should come out fairly clean.

The result?  Well because it is just as good but fewer calories, I can of course eat more, right?  Wrong.  But for those of you who can control compulsive eating, this is a holiday blessing.

See that raging red frontal lobe? That's me on a diet! Rats, they won't sedate me until it's over. I don't mind a year heavily sedated so I can't make a move toward the kitchen. I don't want my stomach stapled, thanks. Each trip past that office supply store would remind me of it.

©At Grandma’s Table.  Registration Pending

Pecan Butter Cookies

These pecan butter cookies are easy to make & even easier to eat! Enjoy!

PECAN BUTTER COOKIES

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup sifted flour
  • 1/4 tsp. salt
  • 1/2 cup unsalted butter
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1/2 tsp. vanilla
  • 3/4 cup finely chopped pecans

Sift together the flour and salt. Cream butter, sugar and vanilla. Add flour and mix until blended. Add pecans and stir to distribute evenly. Chill if necessary to handle dough easily. Shape into one inch balls and place a few inches apart on an ungreased cookie sheet. Bake in a slow oven (325 degrees) for about 25 minutes. Remove from oven and place on wire rack. Cookies, while still warm, may be rolled in confectioner’s sugar or a mixture of granulated sugar and cinnamon. Makes about 2 1/2 dozen.

posted by Mountain Republic                                                    recipe by Amy Chenevert